BlackoutHeartbreaking.  A memoir for our time.

On NPR’s Fresh Air, Terry Gross interviews Sarah Hepola about her book, Blackout: Remembering the Things I Drank to Forget.  The world convinced her that she should drink as much as men, and sleep around as much—and consider it as casual and meaningless—as men.  As the publisher’s summary on Amazon puts it,

For Sarah Hepola, alcohol was “the gasoline of all adventure.” She spent her evenings at cocktail parties and dark bars where she proudly stayed till last call. Drinking felt like freedom, part of her birthright as a strong, enlightened twenty-first-century woman.

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Feminist Nightmare

May 13, 2012

Happy Mother’s Day, the final day of National Offend a Feminist Week.  I don’t know whether being told that they have ironically ushered in a Brave New World of women’s degradation will offend feminists or not, but here goes:

In the wake of feminism and the sexual revolution, our society has degenerated surprisingly far (and continues to degenerate?) toward some kind of pre-civilizational nightmare dystopia in which men don’t respect women, and women don’t even respect themselves, as even those who exploit it will sometimes tell you:

(Blog entry)

The reason why I can string along multiple women is because each woman thinks she’s the girlfriend and the others are just women I have sex with.

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I’m not sure whether it qualifies, but here’s my contribution to The Other McCain’s National Offend a Feminist Week:

Note that I would never have heard of Offend a Feminist Week (much less participated in it) if not for female blogger No One of Any Import, who explains,

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People Should Marry Earlier

September 27, 2011

And they have no idea.

I was reading some of the blogs featured on the WordPress* main page today.  Among the comments on one, I found this:

. . . I’ve been doing online dating off and on since college! It worked better for me when I was younger—possibly because that was before most people have really been burned and they were more optimistic and open.   Read the rest of this entry »

While doing research for work, I ran into this, a compilation of empirical and other information tending to support the position that “placing women in physically demanding jobs in the military, as for example combat,” is unwise.  A couple of typical examples:

“Using the standard Army Physical Fitness Test, [an Army researcher] found that the upper quintile of women at West point achieved scores on the test equivalent to the bottom quintile of men.”

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I was with some people last night when one of the girls in the group set her bag down with a thump, prompting someone to remark that it must be very heavy.  Read the rest of this entry »

On Being “Driven”

November 18, 2010

A friend calls my attention to an interesting article about women, work, and culture in the Netherlands.  It suggests that in feminist and post-feminist America, women tend to feel unrelenting pressure to succeed on the same terms as men in the workplace, while also trying to find time for such traditionally feminine activities as caring for their children.  Because women are given no more hours in the day than men are, they cannot find the time to do everything, and are unhappier than American women of generations past. Read the rest of this entry »