More on illegal immigration from The New Republic (“Why Liberals Should Oppose the Immigration Bill”, T. A. Frank):

Enforcement of immigration law is not all that hard. Illegal immigration can never be reduced to zero, of course, but it can be brought down to levels that we had in the 1950s and 1960s, and with very little outright force.  There are plenty of means: enhanced fencing and patrolling at the southern border, E-Verify for all hiring, strict penalties for employers who hire illegally, a biometric entry/exit system, and punishment (and deportation) for entering the country illegally. . . .

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Good line (from a liberal, for whatever it’s worth) to remember the next time a liberal tries to smear conservatives as racist, xenophobic, etc. for thinking we should enforce some of our immigration laws.

I know that unauthorized immigrants are for the most part good, decent people. Deploring illegal immigration is not a condemnation of the immigrants themselves, anymore than deploring traffic is a condemnation of drivers. The rhetoric about hard workers trying to support their families is true, and in a perfect world we could invite everyone in without any tradeoffs. But the United States cannot take in millions upon millions of impoverished workers and hope to provide its own low-income citizens with lives of dignity or economic security.

Hat tip to Charles Cooke.

Jamiel Shaw

A father mourns his son, murdered by a gang member who would not even have been in the country if the government were serious about enforcing immigration laws

The National Review editors have a new piece out today against the amnesty currently being contemplated in the Senate.

The fundamental problem with this bill, both in its earlier form and in the new Hoeven-Corker form, is that it confers an immediate amnesty on illegals already present in the country in exchange for promises of tightened border security at some point in the future. Not very tight, mind you: The bill’s own supporters do not contest forecasts that over the next 20 years we would once again find ourselves with 11 million or more illegal immigrants, just as we have now. Stronger security provisions, such as requiring that the border fence be completed before amnesty is handed down, were rejected.

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Multiculturalism

April 30, 2011

I have fond childhood memories of John Cleese in Monty Python’s Flying Circus and Disney’s non-cartoon The Jungle Book.  So I was interested to learn (via Five Feet of Fury) that Cleese (“a generous donor to the Liberal Democrats who . . . has appeared in several party political broadcasts”) seems to have joined what may be an emerging consensus that multiculturalism, the West’s great experiment, has failed:

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Support Arizona

May 13, 2010

You may have heard that Arizona recently passed an immigration law.*  Its critics claim several objections; according to them, among other things:

1—A state has no business dealing with the immigration problem; that’s for the federal government.
(The federal government has chosen not to enforce the border, and that should be the end of that!)

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