As you listen to commentators talking about “excessive” military spending and the federal budget deficit, this is your friendly periodic reminder that all U. S. military spending amounts to only 16% of federal spending, while forced redistribution represents 59% of federal spending.  In dollar terms, forced redistribution is now the majority of what the federal government does; the federal government is literally a huge forced-redistribution operation with a smaller national-defense side project.

CBPP 2018-08-14 cropped.PNG

Don’t take my word for it; these numbers are according to the CBPP, which even the left agrees is of the left.

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Glass Half Full

July 30, 2015

From today’s e-mail newsletter from NRO’s Jim Geraghty:

From the way conservatives talk, one would never know that Republicans have 54 U.S. Senate seats, 246 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives (a majority that the party could easily hold for the next decade), 31 governors, and 68 out of 98 partisan state legislatures. Republicans control the governorship and both houses in 23 states; Democrats control only seven.

Abortions have dropped 12 percent nationwide since 2010 and are down in almost every state. The divorce rate declined significantly in the past generation and is staying down, while the marriage rate is up a bit. Slate concedes, “Most Americans have given up on achieving meaningful gun control in their lifetimes or in their grandchildren’s lifetimes.”

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Ed Morrissey makes a good point (“Religion: The new Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell?”) about the government’s new definition of marriage:  As a country, we allowed Quakers and other religious objectors to opt out of military service, even in World War II.  The protection extends to non-religious objectors as well.  If the government doesn’t force people to act against their principles for national defense and saving the world from Nazis—the most “compelling interest” the government can have—why on earth should it force people to participate (whether by baking cakes, issuing the licenses, or otherwise) in same-sex marriages?

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Two contributors at The Volokh Conspiracy, both of whom support Obergefell’s redefinition of marriage to include same-sex couples, nevertheless argue that it was a poor decision that will have unintended consequences.

Ilya Somin: “A great decision on same-sex marriage – but based on dubious reasoning”

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Happy 800th anniversary of the signing of the Magna Carta!

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Great line.  From George Will’s column this week:

Daniel Patrick Moynihan, a lifelong New Deal liberal and accomplished social scientist, warned that “the issue of welfare is not what it costs those who provide it, but what it costs those who receive it.”

(The apt headline and subtitle NRO gives it on the main page are “The Perils of Dependency: It’s changing our national character.”)

See also Mark Steyn and even FDR on the welfare state.

Four Reasons to Vote Today

November 4, 2014

Federal vs. state spending

See below

1: Obamacare

While we work toward electing a better chief executive in 2016, now is a great time to start building a Republican majority in the Senate, both to take such steps as they can in 2015 and to pass a full repeal and replacement of Obamacare in 2017.

National Review has a timely editorial on the subject: “Obamacare: Unpopular as Ever”

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