Every four years, at their presidential nominating conventions, the Republican and Democratic Parties write their official platforms.  (Apparently one Web site has the text of past platforms going back to 1840.)

You can read them yourself, but they are not simple lists of concise statements of the parties’ positions; they’re full of background, findings of fact, and other long-winded attempts to frame the issues in their favor, present their positions in a way that makes them sound reasonable, and persuade the reader to agree with them.  Fair enough, and perhaps that’s inevitable, but the result is that the 2012 Republican Party platform (in PDF form) is some 60 pages long, the Democrats40.  As Speaker John Boehner has remarked, “If it were up to me, I’d have the platform on one sheet of paper.  Have you ever met anybody who read the party platform?  I’ve never met anybody.”

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Via Grand Rants I find an “infographic” from Ace of Spades (full-size version here) entitled “The Obama Presidency: By the Numbers”.

It presents some promises and other things President Obama and others in his administration said a few years ago, juxtaposed with various numbers (e.g., the unemployment rate) showing how things have turned out so far.  It’s very succinct and easy to read.   Read the rest of this entry »

Oxymoron for President

March 31, 2011

More inside baseball, but if you’re interested in this stuff, another writer at National Review Online also pans most of the rest of the Republican governors (and one speaker of the House) expected to run for president in 2012—Mitt Romney, Mike Huckabee, Newt Gingrich, Tim Pawlenty, Haley Barbour, and Mitch Daniels—as big-government conservatives (in which case, “conservatives”).

Does anyone have an opinion on whether Rick Perry or John Bolton is a serious possibility?