Ji Seong-ho

Mark Steyn on the state of our “sclerotic republic”:

. . . the Empire State Building was finished in 18 months during a depression, but in the 21st century the global superpower cannot put up two replacement skyscrapers within a decade.

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fruit cordialMark Steyn remarked this week en passant,

In 2013 I bust up with National Review, for various reasons, some of which I’m not at liberty to disclose but all of which fall broadly under the banner of free speech. I’m very big on that. It’s my core issue.

It’s as perhaps as explicit an acknowledgement as we’re likely to get (from any of the parties involved) that the split was partly over litigation strategy, and partly over the fruit cordial.

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Feline Groovy cover art

Mark Steyn writes, “A couple of days ago France’s leading feline forum, Bonjour Le Chat, interviewed me about Marvin. For non-francophones, I’ll provide a few anglo snippets once this Senate testimony’s behind me.”

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I don’t think there’s any doubt I’m a big fan of Mark Steyn.  I would never mock Mark (though I would love to be a mock Mark).  Given his T-shirt design, you might even call me a Mark St’ist.

But I have to disagree with him today.  I think Steyn’s piece about Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders makes good points, but he almost says that Trump is the only one who has raised actual policy issues in the campaigns so far:

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In the church year, Easter is when the we remember Christ’s resurrection and ultimate triumph over death; Good Friday is when we remember that we, in our sin, put Him to death.

In observance of Good Friday today, Mark Steyn reprints his 2004 review of Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ.  (Note that this link will probably expire.)

Instead of Jesus the wimp, Mel gives us Jesus the Redeemer. He died for our sins — ie, the “violent end” is the critical bit, not just an unfortunate misunderstanding cruelly cutting short a promising career in gentle teaching. . . .

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Mark Steyn on Benghazi

September 30, 2012

Mark Steyn, as usual, is must-read material.  I recommend his last three weekly columns, about Benghazi and what has happened since.

Did you know that since Benghazi, the Islamists have also destroyed six of our Harrier jets and killed two of our Marines?  (More.)  Neither does anyone else.  See also pro-Obama media bias.

Steyn:

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Steyn on American Credibility

September 18, 2013

PutinMark Steyn, as usual, is must-read material.  His last two columns have been about the Obama administration’s flailing around and getting played by Putin on Syria.

“An Accidental War: Perfunctory and ineffectual war-making in Syria is worse than nothing.” (or at Orange County Register)

In the unimprovable formulation of an unnamed official speaking to The Los Angeles Times, the White House is carefully calibrating a military action “just muscular enough not to get mocked.”

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The Heritage Foundation’s Michael Franc offers an encouraging word in “Parsing the Polls: If Gallup is right, Tuesday will be a long night for the Democratic party.”  (On the main page, National Review Online subtitles it “If Gallup’s right, Obama’s toast.”)

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Steyn on Fluke, America

March 14, 2012

Mark Steyn, as usual, is must-read material:

Nor is the core issue that, whatever the merits of government contraception, America is the Brokest Nation in History — although the Fluke story is a useful reminder that the distinction between fiscal and social conservatism is generally false. . . . When even casual sex requires a state welfare program, you’re pretty much done for.

Mark & Mark!

August 20, 2011

(Via Steyn Online, whence the title of this entry.)

Mark Steyn had a great line in an interview with Mark Levin about Steyn’s new book:

What I think is the difference when you talk about the divide in America is I think most conservatives exist in a kind of oppositional world.  They know every time they go and see a Hollywood movie, every time they switch on a sitcom and hear a certain kind of cheap joke, every time they happen to be stuck at the airport and they’re watching some drone on CNN—they understand the other guy’s point of view, they’re exposed to it relentlessly.  Read the rest of this entry »

Culture of Death

March 21, 2013

Mark Steyn reflects on “abortion” “doctor” Kermit Gosnell’s grisly murder business, and how differently the mainstream news media treat its death toll from, say, those of the Jared Loughner and Adam Lanza shootings.

Gosnell’s murderous regime in Philadelphia reflects on him. The case’s all but total absence from the public discourse reflects on America . . . .

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Many agree with what Mark Steyn and others have said before:  The culture is deeper than politics, and our politics are a result of our culture much more than the other way around.  Unfortunately, our culture has been degenerating in this direction for some time.

At the same time, conservatives ought to recognize that our deeper problems . . . are cultural, not political, and are therefore not susceptible of a political solution.

Edmund Burke questioned whether the state can even distribute alms without doing more harm than good. . . .

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More on Obamacare

July 4, 2012

Happy Independence Day!  What better way to celebrate than with another depressing Mark Steyn column about our increasing dependence and the slow death of liberty?

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National Interest

December 5, 2011

As usual, Mark Steyn is must-read material.

Mark Steyn, as usual, is must-read material:

As Obama made plain in his threat to Gran’ma last week that the August checks might not go out, funding nonproductivity is now the principal purpose of the modern state.

You heard it here first:  On Rush Limbaugh today, Mark Steyn joked that he will soon have a new imminently soon-to-be-imminently-released book.  It will be all about the over-burdening of America with regulations, such as in the case of the lemonade stand shut down by police in Georgia, or the banning of homemade goods at bake sales in Pennsylvania.  (As the Wall Street Journal article’s subtitle puts it, “Inspector Nabs Homemade Desserts At St. Cecilia Church’s Lenten Fish Fry.”  The tag and URL on the first story put it very succinctly: “strange” and “bizarre”.)  Read the rest of this entry »

Just after arguing with a reader about the national debt, I find myself reading a good piece by Mark Steyn (redundant? “a piece by Mark Steyn”?), which includes this excellent and topical paragraph:

[Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid] and too many other Americans seem to be living their version of the old line: If you owe the bank a thousand dollars, you have a problem; if you owe the bank a million dollars, the bank has a problem. America owes the world $14 trillion, so the world has a problem.

Safe, Legal, and Rare

February 10, 2011

Mark Steyn has a roundup, appropriately hyperlinked, of some very inappropriate things that are being done in the service of abortion.  If you have a strong stomach (fair warning: this is very disturbing stuff), I recommend it, especially if you haven’t heard about any of this yet from your normal news sources.  Read the rest of this entry »

Dishonor upon Dishonor

November 6, 2009

Mark Steyn has a couple of quick thoughts on what looks like the growing trend of Muslim “honor killings” in the multicultural West—diversity is strength, don’t you know; just one more thread in our rich multicultural tapestry—and, apropos, on yet another double standard in the news media.

Update (October 1st, 2014):  For whatever reason, the two links to Mark Steyn in NRO’s The Corner above seem to have been disconnected.  One of them, or at least a related post, is here:

http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/232016/honor-and-shame-mark-steyn

Excerpt:

I’ve noted this phenomenon many times: See, for example, here at NR, “Noor Ignored”, “Watery Graves”, “The Stranglehold of Political Correctness”, and “Headless Body in Legless Story”. But nothing changes. Multiculturalism trumps feminism, and so the media accept a two-tier sisterhood in which Muslim girls are run over, stabbed, strangled, drowned and decapitated for wanting to live like the women they read about in The New York Times and The Washington Post. No matter how novel or arresting the details of a story are, the PC blinkers go on immediately. As Miss Chesler adds:

In 2009, the gruesome beheading of Aasiya Z. Hassan was covered only five days later by the New York Times—and then mainly to explain that Islam had nothing to do with it and that anyone who believes to the contrary is misguided or prejudiced.

(Hyperlinks in original.)

The Death of Liberty

November 3, 2009

In the formerly free West, liberty dies a little at a time.

From the U. K.’s Daily Mail, via Mark Steyn: The British government literally took a couple’s children away from them “over fears they would also become clinically obese”.  First of all, the parents aren’t even that fat; look at the picture.  But even if they were: What?  Since when does the government of a liberal democracy have the power to do that?  It’s tyranny, and it’s cruel.  God be with those parents, and their children.

As Mark Steyn says, one gets the impression that everything (including even children, apparently) is implicitly understood to belong to the state (as in Communism), lent out to the parents only at the state’s pleasure.  Read the rest of this entry »