BlackoutHeartbreaking.  A memoir for our time.

On NPR’s Fresh Air, Terry Gross interviews Sarah Hepola about her book, Blackout: Remembering the Things I Drank to Forget.  The world convinced her that she should drink as much as men, and sleep around as much—and consider it as casual and meaningless—as men.  As the publisher’s summary on Amazon puts it,

For Sarah Hepola, alcohol was “the gasoline of all adventure.” She spent her evenings at cocktail parties and dark bars where she proudly stayed till last call. Drinking felt like freedom, part of her birthright as a strong, enlightened twenty-first-century woman.

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NPR transgender 'teacher'

If you think a child this young (R) should get to radically redefine gender and parenting roles, maybe you’re the one with “gender-identity confusion”

If NPR were really interested in reporting the news impartially (as opposed to conducting a social-engineering propaganda campaign), they would probably report on this interesting development, reported by Life Site News (also covered at The Federalist Papers Project):

(Short version: Maya Dillard Smith was the interim ACLU director for a whole state; she’s impeccably liberal but resigned because she cannot support the militant new transgender activism.)

The African-American woman who leads a state chapter of the ACLU has resigned, citing her own daughters’ “frightened” reaction to biological males using the women’s restroom.

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I had heard that Obama gave a speech in Indiana making the case for voting for Democrats, but I had no idea of the, er, eloquence and elegance of his arguments…

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Granted, Wikipedia is greatly improved since its early days.  Often it now cites its sources; often inaccurate information is removed almost as soon as a rogue editor adds it.

Still, for anyone who carelessly assumes that Wikipedia today is simply accurate and trustworthy, occasionally Wikipedia itself provides a cautionary reminder.  From the first paragraph, the very top, of the article on Jainism:

It prescribes ahimsa (non-violence) towards all living beings to the most possible extent. The five main principles of Jainism are ahimsa, anekantavada (non-absolutism), aparigraha (non-possessiveness) and guruajna (obeyance of the preachings of the preacher).

Further down in the article, it talks about the “extreme difficulty” of “attaining true faith”.  I don’t see what’s so difficult; all you have to do is embody five out of four principles!

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