Fewer (but Still a Lot of) Illegal Immigrants

April 27, 2012

“So, Is Mexican Immigration Over?”, Mark Krikorian, National Review Online:

A new report finds that the number of Mexican immigrants in the United States has declined for the first time since the Great Depression. . . .

That doesn’t mean illegal immigration from Mexico has stopped . . . . But the number of immigrants giving up and going home has indeed increased, and only between 5 and 35 percent of them are estimated to have been deported; the rest left on their own.

In other words, the policy of attrition through enforcement works. This is what Governor Romney meant when he mentioned “self-deportation.”

(Links in original.)

Relatedly, the National Review editors weigh in on the Arizona immigration law (the Supreme Court heard oral arguments on it this week).

Updates (April 27th, 2012): Two more related items:

Mark Krikorian comments in the Corner about the oral arguments before the Supreme Court earlier this week:

The headline quote comes from Justice Sotomayor, who didn’t seem to buy the administration’s argument any more than the more conservative justices. After quoting a particularly meaningless reply to a justice by Verrilli, Hindraker at Powerline added, “that answer was incoherent, obviously, but not because Verrilli is a fool; rather, because the Obama administration’s position is indefensible.” . . .

But what’s struck me most over the past few days is how the Left does not even understand the concept of constitutionalism. They virtually all seem to think that “constitutional” means “a policy I like” and “unconstitutional” means “a policy I don’t like,” which is why they are so appalled at the prospect of losing before the Supremes on Obamacare or S.B. 1070.

—and about the popularity of Arizona’s law:

I figured the open-border crowd’s frenzied attacks on S.B. 1070 would at least soften public support for the bill. But I was wrong.

A Quinnipiac poll of registered voters taken Friday found the public supporting the bill 68–27. Hispanics were split down the middle, which you would never know if you listened just to the Soros/Ford Foundation protuberances who pretend to speak on their behalf. Even more remarkable is the fact that support has been increasing and opposition decreasing; the numbers in February were 64–32, and in November of last year were 61–34. Given that “don’t know/no answer” stayed the same, that means fully 20 percent of those who disapproved of the bill in November have changed their minds.

(Links in originals.)

About these ads

7 Responses to “Fewer (but Still a Lot of) Illegal Immigrants”

  1. Snoodickle Says:

    So does President Obama get credit for this trend? Or does Romney get credit for saying the words “self-deportation”?


  2. No, President Obama doesn’t get credit for a trend that began before he took office and has diminished under his administration. He does get credit for not being 100% as awful on immigration as a president theoretically could be and diminishing the trend all the way down to nothing.

    According to this Corner item from Mark Krikorian in February (he links to his source),

    If that ends up being the case, that will mean that the illegal population stopped declining as soon as Obama took office, after dropping by one million during the last two years of the Bush administration.

    The table here suggests that Mexican immigration to the U. S. declined steeply after 2004 but has been declining much more slowly since Obama took office.

    Obama gets credit for the new policy of deporting only the worst criminals, in effect an “administrative amnesty” that “could mean release for many of the 300,000 people currently facing deportation in the US.”

    Obama also gets credit for mocking even moderate, pro-amnesty politicians who nonetheless also insist on enforcing immigration law to some extent as wanting a “moat” with “alligators”, and for claiming that the border fence was “now basically complete” when it was less than 50% complete. (Note that even if it were 90% complete, that wouldn’t be 90% as good as having it complete; it would be much less useful, if not totally useless, because would-be illegal immigrants would gravitate toward the 10% that was still open.)

    • Snoodickle Says:

      http://articles.cnn.com/2011-10-19/politics/politics_deportation-record_1_ice-director-john-morton-undocumented-immigrants-criminal-alien-program?_s=PM:POLITICS

      Record deportations three years in a row. If you’re not going to acknowledge reality, there is no hope for you.


      • If you don’t trust my sources and you don’t even read your own sources, there is no hope for you. From the article you just linked to:

        The administration is “playing a double game,” argued Mark Krikorian, executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies, which favors tighter immigration restrictions. “They’re telling (pro-immigration) advocacy groups that they’re focusing on the worst of the worst” by committing more resources to the most dangerous undocumented immigrants.

        “But they’re telling the broader public they’ve achieved record levels of deportations. It’s a clever spin.”
        . . .
        The 396,906 figure is indeed a record — but not by much. A total of 392,862 people were deported in 2010 — a difference of little more than 1%, according to ICE. Almost 390,000 people were deported the year before that.

        Significantly larger increases in the total number of deportations occurred during George W. Bush’s administration. Fewer than 120,000 people were deported in 2001, when Bush took office.

        Analysts say much of the change over the last decade has been due to the implementation of controversial federal-led measures such as Secure Communities initiative and the Criminal Alien Program, which are designed to root out undocumented immigrants accused or convicted of various criminal acts. Both measures predate Obama’s presidency.
        . . .
        Producing new deportation records — however slim the margin — appears to be a priority for the Obama White House. Pundits argue the ability to tout such records could be political gold for a Democratic president wooing independent voters in 2012, though it does risk alienating Obama’s liberal base.
        . . .
        Lower priority cases — those not involving individuals considered violent or otherwise dangerous — will be suspended, the department said.

        Administration officials call it a matter of prioritizing cases and allocating scarce resources more efficiently. Critics call it backdoor amnesty, a way to push through policy changes that conservatives in Congress would never agree to.

      • Snoodickle Says:

        I’m going to ask a simple question, has the Obama administration set the deportation record three years in a row?


      • I answer again from your own source:

        The 396,906 figure is indeed a record — but not by much. A total of 392,862 people were deported in 2010 — a difference of little more than 1%, according to ICE. Almost 390,000 people were deported the year before that.

        Significantly larger increases in the total number of deportations occurred during George W. Bush’s administration. Fewer than 120,000 people were deported in 2001, when Bush took office.

        Analysts say much of the change over the last decade has been due to the implementation of controversial federal-led measures such as Secure Communities initiative and the Criminal Alien Program . . . . Both measures predate Obama’s presidency.

        In other words, if deportations are your measure, Bush produced much more impressive increases from one year to another. Obama’s 1% increase, by comparison, is distinctly unimpressive. It builds on the effective policies Bush had already implemented before him.

        I notice that he’s happy to take credit for what he “inherited” from Bush when it suits him.

      • Snoodickle Says:

        Ok, so yes. Wait, are you criticizing the president for continuing and effectively enforcing prior policies? That’s weird.


Agree? Disagree? Thoughts?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 133 other followers

%d bloggers like this: